Calendar

Apr
17
Sat
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Sun
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Mon
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Wed
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Thu
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Fri
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Sat
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Mon
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”

Apr
17
Tue
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker
Apr 17 – Apr 16 all-day
1934: Death of Benjamin Rucker

Professor Black Herman died on April 17, 1934, while on tour in Louisville, Kentucky.  In an obituary, The New York Age, a leading African American newspaper, described him as one of Harlem’s most colorful characters — a magician, seer, herb specialist and fortune teller; a man who, among his followers, “had risen to the standing of god whom they expect to rise out of his grave.”